Cavallo (Horse Set) by Antonio Canova

Cavallo (Horse Set) by Antonio Canova

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A Vatican Library Collection Fine Art Limited Edition

Antonio Canova (after) etching by Domenico Marchetti,

Cavallo (horse for an equestrian statue, front and back view)

Edition medium: Giclée print on Somerset Velvet Paper 330g.

Inks: Archival pigment inks

Color Permanence: Rated for 100+ years

 

This is a numbered, paired set of the front and back view.

Available in two sizes, Medium and Large.

Medium Print Size: 23″ High x 25.75″ Wide.

Limited Edition of 150, numbered 50/150. Comes with a certificate of authenticity.

Large Print Size: 34″ High x 39″ Wide.

Limited Edition of 150, numbered 1/150. Comes with a certificate of authenticity.

Stampati barberiniani X I  13a, fol. 17.

Blind embossed with the seal of the Vatican Library Collection!

These are no longer being made. This is the last ones. Unframed. Note: there is no watermark on the actual Giclées. 


Artist’s Biography

 

Antonio Canova

 

Antonio Canova (1757-1822) is considered the greatest Italian sculptor of his time. An enormously prolific natural talent, he gave up marriage and family life to dedicate himself to his work. This detailed etching by Dominco Marchetti (1780-1844) skillfully illustrates the front view of Canova’s Cavallo and embodies the stunning beauty, power, and grace for which Canova is known. Cavallo is preserved in the Stampe, or Print, collection, of the Vatican Library (Stampe V shelf 240, folio 72).

 

Born in 1757 in the village of Possagno, in the province of Treviso, Canova was educated by his grandfather, a stone-cutter of exceptional ability. Before he was ten, Canova was proficient in sculpting both clay and marble. The young Canova’s talent attracted attention from a local senator, and in 1768 he was placed in the workshop of Giuseppe Bernardi (often called Toretto,) with whom he studied for two years. Bernardi’s subsequent move to Venice gave his young apprentice a chance to study life drawing at the Venice Academy and antique sculpture from the Palazzo Farsetti.

 

In 1780 Canova went to Rome and was deeply inspired by new ideas and fresh energy. An obsessive and prolific artist, his work soon attracted major commissions from important patrons such as Napoleon Bonaparte, his sister Pauline Borghese, Popes Clement XIII and XIV, and even the United States government. He made a career of capturing the softness of flesh, the movement of fabric, and the subtle curves and hollows of the body. In 1805 he was appointed the Inspector General of Fine Arts and Antiquities of the papal state.

 

Canova created a vast range of sculptures, from funerary monuments to a statue of George Washington, but he is best remembered for his graceful works emphasizing fluid gestures and realistic expressions. Often called “the supreme minister of beauty,” and “a unique and truly divine man” by those who knew him, Canova was known to be gentle, modest, and spiritual. He cared deeply about the advancement of young artists, and was generous in endowing charities for the arts, artists, and his native town, showing foresight in his concern for preservation of works of art. Canova’s work was sought by the powerful of every nationality and political persuasion. He received many honors, orders of chivalry, and was named a perpetual president of the Roman Academy of St. Luke. He died Venice in 1822, and was buried in his native village of Possagno, where he spent large sums erecting a memorial church. Canova is known today as the most widely acclaimed sculptor of neo-classicism.

 

 

 

 

 

Antonio Canova (1757-1822)

Antonio Canova (1757-1822) is considered the greatest Italian sculptor of his time. An enormously prolific natural talent, he gave up marriage and family life to dedicate himself to his work. This detailed etching by Dominco Marchetti (1780-1844) skillfully illustrates the front view of Canova’s Cavallo and embodies the stunning beauty, power, and grace for which Canova is known. Cavallo is preserved in the Stampe, or Print, collection, of the Vatican Library (Stampe V shelf 240, folio 72).

Born in 1757 in the village of Possagno, in the province of Treviso, Canova was educated by his grandfather, a stone-cutter of exceptional ability. Before he was ten, Canova was proficient in sculpting both clay and marble. The young Canova’s talent attracted attention from a local senator, and in 1768 he was placed in the workshop of Giuseppe Bernardi (often called Toretto,) with whom he studied for two years. Bernardi’s subsequent move to Venice gave his young apprentice a chance to study life drawing at the Venice Academy and antique sculpture from the Palazzo Farsetti.

In 1780 Canova went to Rome and was deeply inspired by new ideas and fresh energy. An obsessive and prolific artist, his work soon attracted major commissions from important patrons such as Napoleon Bonaparte, his sister Pauline Borghese, Popes Clement XIII and XIV, and even the United States government. He made a career of capturing the softness of flesh, the movement of fabric, and the subtle curves and hollows of the body. In 1805 he was appointed the Inspector General of Fine Arts and Antiquities of the papal state.

Canova created a vast range of sculptures, from funerary monuments to a statue of George Washington, but he is best remembered for his graceful works emphasizing fluid gestures and realistic expressions. Often called “the supreme minister of beauty,” and “a unique and truly divine man” by those who knew him, Canova was known to be gentle, modest, and spiritual. He cared deeply about the advancement of young artists, and was generous in endowing charities for the arts, artists, and his native town, showing foresight in his concern for preservation of works of art. Canova’s work was sought by the powerful of every nationality and political persuasion. He received many honors, orders of chivalry, and was named a perpetual president of the Roman Academy of St. Luke. He died Venice in 1822, and was buried in his native village of Possagno, where he spent large sums erecting a memorial church. Canova is known today as the most widely acclaimed sculptor of neo-classicism.

 

Antonio Canova (1757-1822)

Antonio Canova (1757-1822) is considered the greatest Italian sculptor of his time. An enormously prolific natural talent, he gave up marriage and family life to dedicate himself to his work. This detailed etching by Dominco Marchetti (1780-1844) skillfully illustrates the front view of Canova’s Cavallo and embodies the stunning beauty, power, and grace for which Canova is known. Cavallo is preserved in the Stampe, or Print, collection, of the Vatican Library (Stampe V shelf 240, folio 72).

Born in 1757 in the village of Possagno, in the province of Treviso, Canova was educated by his grandfather, a stone-cutter of exceptional ability. Before he was ten, Canova was proficient in sculpting both clay and marble. The young Canova’s talent attracted attention from a local senator, and in 1768 he was placed in the workshop of Giuseppe Bernardi (often called Toretto,) with whom he studied for two years. Bernardi’s subsequent move to Venice gave his young apprentice a chance to study life drawing at the Venice Academy and antique sculpture from the Palazzo Farsetti.

In 1780 Canova went to Rome and was deeply inspired by new ideas and fresh energy. An obsessive and prolific artist, his work soon attracted major commissions from important patrons such as Napoleon Bonaparte, his sister Pauline Borghese, Popes Clement XIII and XIV, and even the United States government. He made a career of capturing the softness of flesh, the movement of fabric, and the subtle curves and hollows of the body. In 1805 he was appointed the Inspector General of Fine Arts and Antiquities of the papal state.

Canova created a vast range of sculptures, from funerary monuments to a statue of George Washington, but he is best remembered for his graceful works emphasizing fluid gestures and realistic expressions. Often called “the supreme minister of beauty,” and “a unique and truly divine man” by those who knew him, Canova was known to be gentle, modest, and spiritual. He cared deeply about the advancement of young artists, and was generous in endowing charities for the arts, artists, and his native town, showing foresight in his concern for preservation of works of art. Canova’s work was sought by the powerful of every nationality and political persuasion. He received many honors, orders of chivalry, and was named a perpetual president of the Roman Academy of St. Luke. He died Venice in 1822, and was buried in his native village of Possagno, where he spent large sums erecting a memorial church. Canova is known today as the most widely acclaimed sculptor of neo-classicism.

 

Antonio Canova (1757-1822)

Antonio Canova (1757-1822) is considered the greatest Italian sculptor of his time. An enormously prolific natural talent, he gave up marriage and family life to dedicate himself to his work. This detailed etching by Dominco Marchetti (1780-1844) skillfully illustrates the front view of Canova’s Cavallo and embodies the stunning beauty, power, and grace for which Canova is known. Cavallo is preserved in the Stampe, or Print, collection, of the Vatican Library (Stampe V shelf 240, folio 72).

Born in 1757 in the village of Possagno, in the province of Treviso, Canova was educated by his grandfather, a stone-cutter of exceptional ability. Before he was ten, Canova was proficient in sculpting both clay and marble. The young Canova’s talent attracted attention from a local senator, and in 1768 he was placed in the workshop of Giuseppe Bernardi (often called Toretto,) with whom he studied for two years. Bernardi’s subsequent move to Venice gave his young apprentice a chance to study life drawing at the Venice Academy and antique sculpture from the Palazzo Farsetti.

In 1780 Canova went to Rome and was deeply inspired by new ideas and fresh energy. An obsessive and prolific artist, his work soon attracted major commissions from important patrons such as Napoleon Bonaparte, his sister Pauline Borghese, Popes Clement XIII and XIV, and even the United States government. He made a career of capturing the softness of flesh, the movement of fabric, and the subtle curves and hollows of the body. In 1805 he was appointed the Inspector General of Fine Arts and Antiquities of the papal state.

Canova created a vast range of sculptures, from funerary monuments to a statue of George Washington, but he is best remembered for his graceful works emphasizing fluid gestures and realistic expressions. Often called “the supreme minister of beauty,” and “a unique and truly divine man” by those who knew him, Canova was known to be gentle, modest, and spiritual. He cared deeply about the advancement of young artists, and was generous in endowing charities for the arts, artists, and his native town, showing foresight in his concern for preservation of works of art. Canova’s work was sought by the powerful of every nationality and political persuasion. He received many honors, orders of chivalry, and was named a perpetual president of the Roman Academy of St. Luke. He died Venice in 1822, and was buried in his native village of Possagno, where he spent large sums erecting a memorial church. Canova is known today as the most widely acclaimed sculptor of neo-classicism.

 

Antonio Canova (1757-1822)

Antonio Canova (1757-1822) is considered the greatest Italian sculptor of his time. An enormously prolific natural talent, he gave up marriage and family life to dedicate himself to his work. This detailed etching by Dominco Marchetti (1780-1844) skillfully illustrates the front view of Canova’s Cavallo and embodies the stunning beauty, power, and grace for which Canova is known. Cavallo is preserved in the Stampe, or Print, collection, of the Vatican Library (Stampe V shelf 240, folio 72).

Born in 1757 in the village of Possagno, in the province of Treviso, Canova was educated by his grandfather, a stone-cutter of exceptional ability. Before he was ten, Canova was proficient in sculpting both clay and marble. The young Canova’s talent attracted attention from a local senator, and in 1768 he was placed in the workshop of Giuseppe Bernardi (often called Toretto,) with whom he studied for two years. Bernardi’s subsequent move to Venice gave his young apprentice a chance to study life drawing at the Venice Academy and antique sculpture from the Palazzo Farsetti.

In 1780 Canova went to Rome and was deeply inspired by new ideas and fresh energy. An obsessive and prolific artist, his work soon attracted major commissions from important patrons such as Napoleon Bonaparte, his sister Pauline Borghese, Popes Clement XIII and XIV, and even the United States government. He made a career of capturing the softness of flesh, the movement of fabric, and the subtle curves and hollows of the body. In 1805 he was appointed the Inspector General of Fine Arts and Antiquities of the papal state.

Canova created a vast range of sculptures, from funerary monuments to a statue of George Washington, but he is best remembered for his graceful works emphasizing fluid gestures and realistic expressions. Often called “the supreme minister of beauty,” and “a unique and truly divine man” by those who knew him, Canova was known to be gentle, modest, and spiritual. He cared deeply about the advancement of young artists, and was generous in endowing charities for the arts, artists, and his native town, showing foresight in his concern for preservation of works of art. Canova’s work was sought by the powerful of every nationality and political persuasion. He received many honors, orders of chivalry, and was named a perpetual president of the Roman Academy of St. Luke. He died Venice in 1822, and was buried in his native village of Possagno, where he spent large sums erecting a memorial church. Canova is known today as the most widely acclaimed sculptor of neo-classicism.